#4028

11.09.2018

The Shorter the Better . In any case, it’s an excellent way to develop your craft and flex your writing muscles and it is much less daunting than penning a first feature if you haven’t much writing experience. . Many of the best writers and directors started out with shorts. . With all this new technology, shorts films have a lot more interest among regular people, because so many people are making them and putting them on the web. Suddenly, we’re not explaining short films to people. Everybody’s seen one. .

Writing Short Films: 7 Rules Successful Filmmakers Follow

Writing Short Films: 7 Rules Successful Filmmakers Follow

But we do not have the right to invent our own facts, and perpetuating debunked fiction helps no one. . This makes it one of the leading causes of maternal mortality (13%), and can lead to serious complications even when survived. . Worldwide, about 42 million women a year choose to get abortions, and of these about 21.6 million are unsafe. . making abortion illegal simply makes abortion less safe. . atican in Europe (a situation I’ve alluded to before). But whilst the Irish anti-abortion lobbyists boast of Ireland being abortion-free, this sanctimonious . . existing data suggests that cortical processing and therefore foetal perception of pain cannot occur before 24 weeks of gestation”. . This is extremely unlikely to be true. A foetus in the early stages of development lacks the developed nervous system and brain to feel pain or even be aware of their surroundings. . There is no evidence that either medical or modern surgical abortion impacts future fertility. . In the 21st century, the WHO recommend a suction-based technique for surgical abortion, rendering the risk to future fertility negligible. . The suggestion that abortion can damage fertility is understandably terrifying, but based on out-dated understanding of abortion techniques. . Claims that abortion increases the risk of cancer are not credible, a position supported by bodies worldwide, including the WHO, the National Cancer Institute, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the Royal College of Obstetricians . This is absolute unbridled nonsense of the highest order - the abortion-breast-cancer conjecture (ABC) was championed by prominent born-again Christian and anti-abortion campaigner Dr Joel Brind in the early 1990s. . Given this is precisely the attitude fostered by anti-abortion activists, there is a dark irony at play when organisations of this ilk increase the suffering of the very women they claim to help. . the majority of women granted an abortion report relief as their primary feeling, . anti-abortion activists, . This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae”, a conclusion echoed in systematic reviews. . One recent study in Denmark charted the psychological health of 365,550 women, including 84,620 who’d had abortions. They found neither an increase in psychological damage, nor any elevated risk of suicide. . There are few topics in modern discourse quite as divisive, as fraught with misunderstanding and as rooted in deeply-held conviction as abortion.

A scientist weighs up the five main anti-abortion arguments | Science | The Guardian

An issue that has long been argued in normative claims about the nature of human life and women’s autonomy has shifted toward a wobbly empirical debate. . “We’re winning on facts, and we’re winning hearts and minds on science.” . “Science has been used, for a long time, as a bridge to that moral imagination.” . There had been, a long time ago, this mantra from our friends on the other side of this issue that, while a little one is developing in its mother’s womb, it’s not a baby,” she said. “It’s really hard to make that argument when you see and hear . openly pro-life scholars may have a harder time getting their colleagues to take their work seriously. . It’s not a debate, the way global warming is not a debate. There are people claiming global warming is not occurring, but scientists have compelling evidence that it is occurring. Similarly, there are people like Coleman, claiming abortion harms women's . r opponents often do have affiliations with the pro-choice movement. In this case, one of the researchers questioning her work was associated with the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-abortion organization. In an email, Lawrence Finer, the co-author who serves . Anybody with money can get a scientist to say what they want them to say,” said Largent. “That’s not because scientists are whores. It’s because the world is a really complex place, and there are ways that you can craft a scientific investigation . “Science is a practice of using systematic methods to study our world, including what human organisms are in their early states,” . Even with all these internal debates and complications, many in the pro-life movement feel optimistic that scientific advances are ultimately on their side. . Because the pill can prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in a woman’s uterus, advocates argue, it could end a human life. . “We’ve become steeped in a culture in which only the data matter, and that makes us, in some ways, philosophically illiterate,” said Sulmasy, who is also a doctor. . We’ve become steeped in a culture in which only the data matter, and that makes us, in some ways, philosophically illiterate,” said Sulmasy . Both sides tend to use scientific information when it is useful towards making a point that is based on … firmly and sincerely held philosophical and religious convictions.” . “The question of whether the embryo or fetus is a person … is not answerable by science,” . “The cultural authority of science has become so totalitarian, so imperial, that everybody has to have science on their side in order to win a debate,” said Mark Largent . Science is a source of authority that’s often treated as unimpeachable fact. “The cultural authority of science has become so totalitarian, so imperial, that everybody has to have science on their side in order to win a debate,” . the more it just became the logical choice to recognize the developing fetus for what it is: a fetus, instead of some sort of sub-human form,” Malloy said. “It just became so obvious that these were just developing humans.” . When scientific research becomes subordinate to political ends, facts are weaponized. . pro-life activists have been more successful in using that tool to shift the terms of the policy debate. . e play: . In their own way, both movements have made the sam . We didn’t know any of this. . new research in embryology . New technology makes it easier to apprehend the humanity of a growing child and imagine a fetus as a creature with moral status. . if most scientists see random muscle movements. . doctors are debating whether that threshold should be closer to 22 weeks. . when you’re seeing a baby sucking its thumb at 18 weeks, smiling, clapping,” it becomes “harder to square the idea that that 20-week-old, that unborn baby or fetus, is discardable.” . But . she believes studies of fetal development, improved medical techniques, and other advances anchor the movement’s arguments in scientific fact.

Science Is Giving the Pro-Life Movement a Boost - The Atlantic

The state of the U.S. solar industry: 5 questions answered | PBS NewsHour

To the Sub - Google Docs

Noelle Guan Letter of Recommendation - ppaccone@smusd.us - San Marino Unified School District Mail

Like most other Americans, they too were the children of immigrants—but immigrants of a very different kind.

10.09.2018

But slowly, inexorably, the survivors made the new land their own . —were dead. . It was a grim existence, as their debilitating work regime, drafty dormitories, and bland rations invited an early death. Within months of arrival, many of the new immigrants—ridiculed as "outlandish" by their owners . taggering to their feet, bodies still bent from their weeks below deck, shaking with apprehension, the captives were fitted with a new set of shackles—a painful welcome to their new homeland. The captives again confronted the auction block and the prosp . Indeed the shock of arrival only repeated the trauma of African enslavement. . Surviving the Middle Passage was but the first of the many tests faced by the forced immigrants. . The captives then faced the nightmarish transatlantic crossing. . n some places, some forty percent of the slaves died between their initial capture in the interior and their arrival on the coast. . No matter what their sex, age, and nationality, Africans shipped to the New World endured the trauma of enslavement. . The general thrust of the slave trade was toward heterogeneity, throwing different people together in ways that undermined the transfer of any single culture. Mainland North America became a jumble of African nationalities. Their interaction—not their h . new Angola. . Igbo land. . Everywhere planters preferred so-called “men-boys,” along with “women-girls,” young adults whom they could put to work immediately and who would reproduce the labor force. . But by the middle of the eighteenth century, the black population of the Lowcountry began to reproduce itself and the number of African Americans grew, although it did so in tandem with newly arrived Africans. If at mid-century slaves in the Chesapeake ha . saltwater slaves” nearly continuous, lowland slaves had great difficulty forming families and reproducing themselves . The slave trade continued, however, in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and Georgia. There the forced migration from Africa followed a trajectory similar to that of the Chesapeake, but it started later and continued longer. . By mid-century, the majority of enslaved men and women in the Chesapeake had never seen Africa. At the start of the American Revolution, the first Great Migration was over in the Chesapeake. A native people began to sink deep roots in soils of mainland No . By the 1730s, births to slave women outnumbered imports, and the black population was increasing naturally . lthough black people never challenged white numerical dominance in the region, they achieved majorities in a few localities. For many European settlers, it seemed as if the Chesapeake would “some time or other be confirmed by the name of New Guinea.” . they slowly replaced European and African indentured servants as the main source of plantation labor. . rossed the ocean. Although slavers deposited their human cargoes in ports from Providence to New Orleans, the vast majority of slaves who disembarked in mainland North America did so in the Chesapeake (largely Virginia and Maryland) and the Lowcountry (la . The beginnings of plantation production—tobacco in the Chesapeake in the late seventeenth century and rice in the Lowcountry in the early eighteenth century—increased the level of violence, exploitation, and brutality in these regions . the nature of slavery and then the slave trade changed. . With the advent of the plantation in mainland North America, . The first black men and women arrived in mainland North America in the sixteenth century, often accompanying European explorers . In all, some eleven to twelve million Africans were forcibly carried to the Americas. Of those, roughly one-half million (or about 4.5 percent) were taken to mainland North America or what became the United States. . While each of these massive movements shaped and reshaped African American life, none was more important than the first, the so-called Middle Passage from Africa to America. . hen Portuguese ships sailed down the West African coast. The intention was to trade for gold and spices, . African American life in the United States has been framed by migrations, forced and free. A forced migration from Africa—the transatlantic slave trade—carried black people to the Americas. A second forced migration—the internal slave trade—transp .

The Origins of Slavery | AP US History Study Guide from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

.

The Origins of Slavery | AP US History Study Guide from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

. frican American life in the United States has been framed by migrations, forced and free. A forced migration from Africa—the transatlantic slave trade—carried black people to the Americas. A second forced migration—the internal slave trade—transpo . k people to the Americas. A second forced migration—the internal slave trade—transported them from the Atlantic coast to the interior of the American South. A third migration—this time initiated largely, but not always, by black Americans—carried . he nightmarish weeks and sometimes months locked in the holds of stinking slave ships speak to the traumatic loss of freedom . the so-called Middle Passage from Africa to America . A forced migration from Africa—the transatlantic slave trade—carried black people to the Americas. A second forced migration—the internal slave trade—transported them from the Atlantic coast to the interior of the American South. A third migration . African American life in the United States has been framed by migrations, forced and free.

The Origins of Slavery | AP US History Study Guide from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

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